Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Nothing to Lose


My girls love music and art. They are constantly singing, dancing and creating. Boo especially loves art and is constantly crafting. She is forever getting out art supplies and cutting, gluing, drawing - you name it, she loves it. Boo couldn't wait for 1st grade so she could attend "specials," and finally be able to go to art class like her big sister. If you ask her what her favorite thing about school is, she will tell you without blinking an eye, "art." She enjoys music too, and will sing often, but art is definitely her favorite.

Kiki is definitely the more musical child. She sings nonstop and just about anywhere and everywhere. I am not exaggerating when I say everywhere - the child sings while using the bathroom! Her new favorite place to sing right now? In the shower! She loves music class at school and I can always tell you what they are doing in music because she will come home singing the songs she's learned in class. When they have a special event they learning songs for, such as the Veteran's Day assembly, she rehearses every chance she gets. By the time the event comes, I could practically sing the songs in my sleep, I've heard them so much. While Kiki enjoys art, she would tell you music is her favorite.

The art and music teachers at their school are wonderful. Both of them really know how to make their subject fun, but also teach the students valuable skills that relate to what they are learning in the regular classroom. They don't just sing and draw, but the learn all about technique, patterns, reading notes, art mediums, composers and artists. I could go on and on. Just recently Kiki told me her favorite classical music song was Beethoven's 5th Symphony and she knew and could pronounce the composer's name of The Nutcracker (Tchaikovsky, in case you didn't know). And she's only in third grade.

I can't imagine school without art and music class. These subjects, while enjoyable, also help make our children well rounded. They learn that math can be found in a song or a painting and not just in a textbook. Music makes learning those subjects more fun too - anyone learning to count or spell with a song can tell you that. And for a child who may struggle in math or reading, excelling at something such as art or music can really boost self esteem, which goes along way to helping them succeed in school.

Due to slowing economy and budget cuts, our school district, and many others across the state, may have to cut art and music in grades K-6. We may also lose our media specialists, nurses and clerical staff. Class sizes may increase from and average of 25 to 44 students. When I first heard of this last week, my heart sank. I felt sick to my stomach. And I am not even one of the teachers that may be affected by those cuts. Just the thought of my girls and all of the students missing out on such important education, makes me sad. I want to cry when I think of losing the loving and dedicated art, music and media teachers.

I have a college degree in Education. I've never been fortunate enough to have my own classroom, but I've subbed, was a teacher's aide for a student with special needs, and I now volunteer regularly in my daughters' classrooms. I know how hard these teachers work every day and that they often go above and beyond for their students. I see the passion these teachers have at our school for educating our youth. Despite the fact that they have 25-30 kids in their classrooms, they manage to help each student the best that they can. They do what they can to make sure students who are struggling get extra help, and challenge everyone to do their personal best.

I can't imagine how difficult teaching will be if there are 44 students to a classroom. How are they are going to be able to focus on making sure kids can read, write and add and also find time to teach art and music? If they manage to find a way to the media center, they will likely only be checking out books. There won't be anyone to teach them lessons on the computer or involve them in an author study.

I am not a politician and I don't particularly like politics. Part of my disdain is that politicians of all shapes and sizes say they are going to make education a priority in this country. Yet every single one of them seems to put it on the back burner the second they are elected into office. Our schools are losing money by the day and no one seems to care. Everything else takes a priority, and I just don't get it. When are people going to realize education is our future? That none of the rest of it would happen if we didn't have teachers and schools to help educate our children. Sure we could all home school. I know there are some really great parents who have had great experiences homeschooling their children. But not everyone has the means or ability to home school. Even with my background, I am not so confident that I could do so and be as successful as the classroom teachers are.

Our country is failing when it comes to education, and something has got to change. Education is becoming for the privileged, and everyone else is left to get by on whatever they can afford. Which for most means no special classes, no opportunities to learn about music, art and technology.

I hear so many people say they don't want tax increases, that they can't afford to spend money on schools and education. And of course not nearly enough people want to devote time to figuring out a solution. Politicians are too busy campaigning to really come up with a good education plan that they will implement past election day. I keep hearing "we can't afford it." My question is, can we afford to continue this way? Can we neglect our children and schools to the point that our country falls apart? By devoting our money and resources to improving education, we have everything to gain. As a country, we could only get better. Seriously, what is there to lose?

13 comments:

Traci said...

Amen Sister! Very well said ;)

Anonymous said...

I couldn't agree more...you speak on behalf of many! Thanks, JP

Crimson Wife said...

About homeschooling, research has shown that there is no difference in test scores between students taught by a parent who holds a state teaching credential and those taught by parents who hold a bachelor's degree in another subject. Credential programs focus mostly on classroom management, which isn't really relevant to the 1-on-1 work done in a homeschool setting.

That said, I do agree with you that it is outrageous to have class sizes of 30+ and no art or music.

Kristi said...

I forgot to mention Field Trips have already been canceled for the remainder of the year and will likely be indefinitely. : (

Crimson Wife said...

Homeschooling (at least in the elementary years) is actually much easier than non-homeschoolers imagine it to be. The book I always recommend to folks considering homeschooling is Homeschooling: Take a Deep Breath, You Can Do This! by Terrie Lynn Bittner. The author is wonderfully reassuring that a mom doesn't have to be a rocket scientist, super-patient, or super-organized to do a good job homeschooling :-)

Burgh Baby said...

Very well said. It makes me sad to think that Alexis' music education, which she LOVES, won't be complete because of budget concerns. It's something that we focus on at home, but I would love for her to be exposed to other opinions and ideas outside of what we present.

Anonymous said...

@ Crimson Wife

I think the sentence that said "But not everyone has the means or ability to home school." meant that not everyone is in a situation where they can home school. Single parent, or both parents working. I know we can't in our household.

Anonymous said...

If you are worried about your child's music education then HIRE someone to privately teach your child. First of all, it will be first class as far as the learning goes. Second of all, that's a ridiculous reason to vote for MORE taxes. I'm voting no! It hasn't passed before and it won't this year either.

Susan said...

Krisi--I appreciate your comments! And thank you for appreciating the work we do on a daily basis.

To those who "will vote no"...that is sad. I cannot imagine not feeling like I needed to invest in my community. Voting against supporting your local schools is just wrong. You may have the means to offer private lessons to your own children but many families don't. Noblesville Schools works very hard to offer a well rounded education for kids. It will be a real shame if it cannot continue. Unfortunately the funding has become a real issue. We definitely need the support from our community.

Anonymous said...

The point is not whether a single child won't have music class. That is a very hard-hearted attitude. Some parents simply cannot afford private music lessons for their children, but does that mean that they shouldn't value the enrichment that art and music and literature brings?

Art and music are vital for a cultured society with creative, educated citizens. Why shouldn't we want a rich education for our children?

momma2mingbu said...

Thanks for sharing Kristi! The direction that education funding seems to be headed in this state for the next year or more is very frightening.

Jack Gordon said...

I've never understood why our tax system requires us to have to vote for local taxes to support public education. How about letting me vote for federal income tax rates instead?

Brad said...

Very well said and great to hear from a parent that witnesses how hard teachers work. For those who "vote no", think about a couple of things: 1) Noblesville has been rated a top place to live, do you think that will continue if our schools are over crowded and teachers can't do their best with children? 2) What about your property value? Yes, Hamilton County has high value, but if our schools don't have proper support from the community, your property fails. 3) For those who don't know, post back to me and I will show you first hand how our rooms look with only 20-25 students.